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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the third id is accustomed to those calls. for the past ten years, it's virtually been on the pentagon's speed dial. it led off the invasion of iraq, becoming the first to reach baghdad. >> the first american soldiers to cross into iraq. >> there were three more iraq deployments to follow and now afghanistan. when you went to iraq the first time, would you have ever imagined that in 2012, you would be sitting in afghanistan? >> i did not. >> joseph ayala was one of only a handful of those soldiers remaining. he's been on all but one deployment since. >> the hardest about about being deployed is being away from them. not being able to see their soccer games. and my youngest won started preschool. >> back at ft. stewart in georgia, terry his become a single mom. >> this is our fourth deployment so it's kind of normal, i guess you could say. we go through our normal work, sports, school, only he's not here to share it with us. >> this servicemwith him deploy knowing that he could be hurt. >> as a division, the third id's deployment pace is remarkable, but it's reality for the individual s
and the work of al-qaeda linked groups. intelligence expert who has worked in the pentagon for two decades tells "outfront" the key information left out of the talking points can only mean the administration is covering something up. u.s. intelligence knew about the al qaeda link within 24 hours of the attacks. and the now infamous comments by susan rice saying the attacks were not preplanned, not the work of terror were four days after that. this does not add up. intelligence committee chairman mike rogers is our exclusive guest, but first, elyse has the latest on the news she's been "outfront" with from the start. you have been breaking this, this latest story about the white house choosing to leave information out. what are your sources saying as to why the white house left out key points. like the fact that this was a terrorist attack. >> well, i think, erin, if you look at the chronology of how this happened, the days after the attack -- in fact the day after the attack, my sources were telling me this was a preplanned military style assault, indication that there were terrorists invo
gordon along with our own chief pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. keep it "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. that was me still taking insulin with a vial and syringe. me, explaining what i was doing at breakfast. and me discovering novolog mix 70/30 flexpen. flexpen is pre-filled with your pre-mix insulin. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. no vials, syringes or coolers to carry. flexpen is insulin delivery my way. novolog mix 70/30 is an insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes. do not inject if you do not plan to eat within 15 minutes to avoid low blood sugar. tell your healthcare provider about all medicines you take and all of your medical conditions, including if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. most common side effects include reactions at the injection site, weight gain, swelling of your hands and feet, and vision changes. other serious side effects include low blood sugar and low potassium in your blood. get medical help right away if you experience serious allergic reactions, body rash, trouble with breathing, fast heartbeat, swe
with that as still being the time to leave? when the pentagon announced the end of the surge last week, when they announced the surge was over, they talked less about blunting taliban momentum and more about how the surge helped us train lots of afghan security foes. in tory,ots ra anury forces is a way afghanistan could get more safe. but right now it's also a way americans get killed. by the afghans we are training and arming. afghan troops arturning around and killing american troops they'rsupposed to be working with at such a rate now that t traing a joint operation eee fo w halted this month. and have only now started to scale back up. that's the circumstances in which 68,000 americans are putting eir lives on the line right now while you watch this tv show. 68,000. there is a debate to have here about what we are doing afann. things are worse after the surge than they were before the surge. what was the surge for? why does the deadline for leaving stay the same if the surge was supposed to make things bter and it didn't? if the republicans had picked a candidate who was capable of enga
fighters, the largest program in pentagon history, said the relationship with lockheed, the number one contractor, was the worst he had ever seen. $75 billion has been spent in this program to date. did you agree with that assessment? how could that happen, that relations are so bad with the number one contractor on the number one program in the pentagon's inventory? >> i do not know that i would portray it in those terms. these are difficult negotiations, as they always are, when you are dealing with, you know, the amount of money and complexity that is involved with the joint strike fighter. so there are tough negotiations going on, but i am confident that both parties, as we know from just the nature of these kinds of negotiations, that both parties will ultimately reach a solution. i am not convinced that this has reached a point where we have dead-ended in terms of our ability to find a way out. i think both of us understand that the joint strike fighter is important -- to our security and to the companies that are involved here -- and i think ultimately, it will be resolved. >> y
of power and influence. just as in the united states, the pentagon gave more influence in the state department and others perhaps. same thing in syria. the national security apparatus is very influential. there's some dispute as to how much influence he has over his brother. he is very come every popular amongst the alawite militias as well as the alawite dominated security apparatus and alawite armies. the brother-in-law had been influential. yet then in my view somewhat marginalized in recent years. but again, with a security solution chosen by the regime come he seemed to elevate a little bit until he was killed over the summer. >> host: what about bashar al-assad may surprise people? i read one interview where he said he became an eye doctor because there's no blood involved. just go he told me -- i asked that same question, why did she become an eye doctor? he didn't say he didn't like what, but he lacked the precision of it. he liked the fact that she can cure somebody, you can do some things they can't see them they can't see or they're blurry vision and then they see more cl
the pentagon.gos you would think that if you arec sending were sending more troops to afghanistan, those troops se would go that were the most to credible critical. the places that the taliban was to take over, those at risk fors gains and potentially a takeover by country. instead, we wind up sending the first wave of new forces to abal part of the country with afgha relatively few people and i discovered the answer was sillym tribal rivalries. not iny afghanistan but thewn pentagon. uni it turned out that way that the troops were u.s. marines andn they wanted to bring down helicopters, their own logistics units and they didn't want to d work with u.s. army soldiers inr the areas in and around the city of kandahar.other here was the tail of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting and common purpose against theinter. enemy. and the stories go on. oth there weras internal fightingnti within the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. in one other tail i've recounted some in the book, we have somete serious fighting between president obama's n
' money. the pentagon is putting in place and initiative they call better buying power. they look at the way they set requirements. once you make decisions about a working together with industries, making sure it is done smartly and does not change over time so that things get more and more expensive. there is a great deal to this. efficiency can be had on this side of industry. we are trying to get there. host: can more efficiency lead to more layoffs? guest: it could. there is no desire to lose the human capital. some of the positions we have, folks in nuclear submarines,eight years in training. we like to bring in new people that can learn the skills. but it takes years and years. we are not just talking about big contractors like boeing. 70% of the defense dollar goes to small business. we're talking about the kind of job loss that is massive to small business. one thing that matters -- a lot of these are companies that only do one or two things. they have invested in things that help support a particular product. it is hard to pull back. if that contract goes, they have nothi
conference scheduled at the pentagon. that will begin in just a minute. it is friday, so that means tomorrow is when book tv on c- span 2 begins at 8:00 a.m., an american history tv on the c- span 3 begins at 8:00 a.m.. so, if you need any information about what is on c-span this week, reminder, both the wisconsin and nebraska debates will be live on c-span today. nebraska is at noon. wisconsin is at 9:00 p.m. eastern time. as you can see, this is about to start. we are bringing you live coverage. have a great weekend. >> we are live here at the pentagon this morning for a briefing with secretary of defense, leon panetta and canadian minister of national defense, peter mackay. leon panetta news yesterday as he acknowledged that terrorists had planned and carried out the attack on united states consulate in benghazi earlier this month and killed four americans, including chris stevens. we could get more on that today. also going on on our companion network c-span 2 right now, on land security secretary is discussing cyber security threats. at a summit taking place in the nation's capital. the
by a palestinian president mahmoud abbas. after that, a briefing at the pentagon. our live coverage of political debate continues at 11:00 p.m. eastern with the candidates for senate in nevada. representative heller this is representative berkeley. this race is a toss up. >> israeli prime minister netanyahu spoke about diplomacy and sanctions that are not working with regards to iran. his comments are half an hour. [applause] >> thank you. >> we invite prime minister netanyahu to speak before the assembly. >> thank you. it is a pleasure to see the general assembly presided by the ambassador from israel. it is good to see all of you distinguished delegates. ladies and gentlemen, 3000 years ago king david reigned over the jewish states in at the capitol of jerusalem. i say that to all of those who proclaim that the jewish state has no roots in our region and that it will soon disappear. throughout our history, the jewish people have overcome all of the tyrants who have sought our destruction. it is their ideologies that have been discarded by history. the people of israel live on. brew, we live fo
. they also took questions from reporters at the pentagon. >> good morning. it's always an honor to be able to welcome mr. peter mackay to the pentagon. this is the second time i've had the privilege of hosting a leader in washington and the seventh time we have met since i became secretary of defense. we have built a close relationship between our two countries. we are not just neighbors but very close allies and we are working together on a number of issues. a close working relationship testifies to the importance of the larger u.s.-canada relationship and to our defense partnership. our countries are neighbors and we are friends and our militaries their militaries are working closely together, not just for the security of our two countries but for the security and stability of the americas end of the world. this morning peter and i had the opportunity to discuss a range of important issues in advance of next month's conference of defense ministers of the americas which both of us will be attending. i look forward to joining him in the arab way as we try to develop a future course of acti
these appointments the 70's but what were the big cases? essentially forced nixon out of office and the pentagon papers case they approve school busing. they ended the death penalty in the united states in 1972 and put it back in 1976 and still the most controversy decision of the mall, 1973, roe v wade says states can no longer ban abortion, it was a seven through code to opinion and the only ones were appointed by president kennedy and william rehnquist, three of the four nixon justices were in the majority and i think that tells you a lot about where the republican party was in the 1970's, 1975 william douglas stepped down and president ford nominated john paul stevens to replace him in the confirmation hearing he wasn't asked a question because it wasn't a part of the political dialogue in a way that it later became. the big issue, the big change began in 1980 with the election of ronald reagan because he brought with him to washington a very underrated figure in the recent history, some i don't think this is due as an important area and that is edwin meese because he was first an advisor an
the investigation? we are confirming this morning, one of my colleagues, justin fisher at the pentagon, producer, that the fbi 20 days later still has not set foot in banghazi. >> i would guess the fbi is trying. and my guess is that he -- the individual who makes the decision has decided that the situation's still not safe for that team of people to go in. obviously every day that goes by means that the -- the scene will have been sufficiently disturbed, that the likelihood of their learning much diminishes with every passing day. >> greta: how could it not be safe for our fbi who are pretty well trained for security, yet it was safe for our ambassador and others to be there? >> it wasn't safe. >> greta: well, no, but the thinking. i mean, obviously it wasn't, because they were killed. but the thinking that the fbi are not tough enough and armed enough and ready to go and investigate that, because as you say as time marches on, we lose evidence, we lose information. >> sure. i think that once an event like that happens, and the people are killed, it's clear that they misjudged the security situ
the investigations proceed, the "new york times" reported today that the pentagon and c.i.a. are drawing up contingency plans to kill or capture those believed responsible for the killings. congressman issa's letter also congressman issa's letter detailed some 13 anti-u.s. and anti-western security incidents in the months leading up to the attacks. for more now on the state of security in benghazi and hunt for suspects, we turn to two reporters: siobhan gordon of the "wall street journal" and greg miller of the "washington post." welcome to you both. president obama pledged on september 12 to bring the killers to justice. siobhan, starting with you. how far along is the u.s. in the investigation, the kind of investigation to have to do that some >> they're fairly far along in terms of being able to identify some individuals through either tracking conversations or through video that is picked up. photographs and the like. so they have identified a number of individuals. they are trying to figure out now what the next steps are to deal with those individuals. much they've discovered that the
to penetrate a fence on camp bastion. you'll get the story only from pentagon correspondent barbara starr. >> we see flaming aircrafts, the enemy shooting at us. we're seeking cover and hearing small arms fire, ak-47s. pkms and then at some point soon thereafter see another rpg shot towards us and towards our building. >> reporter: for the first time on television, u.s. marines tell cnn just how bad it got on the night of september 14th here at camp bastion in southern afghanistan when the taliban got inside the base. major grier trembliss and his lieutenant commander christopher rable raced to the scene when the first rounds hit. >> he performed heroically. he engaged the enemy. >> reporter: these taliban video which is nato believes show the insurgents getting ready weeks before the attack, may be a clue to how 15 heavily armed taliban fighters dressed in u.s. style military uniforms, infiltrated through the fence on the eastern edge of the airfield. when it all happened, the taliban broke into three groups. one group headed right for the flight line. six jets were destroyed, more than
, too. >>> terrorist on the attack in libya. top pentagon officials are now speaking out with some of the bluntest language yet. you know, because you been, you know, this is what you had been doing. you know, working, working, working, working, working, working. and now you're talking about, well you know, i won't be, and i get the chance to spend more time with my wife and my kids. it's my world. that's my world. ♪ >>> a man behind that anti-muslim film that provoked so much anger and rage has been arrested. he just appeared via conference. cnn miguel marquez is joining us on the phone. tell us viewers, miguel, what happened. nakoula basseley nakoula has been ordered for a preliminary bail hearing. he has been arrested. my understanding from the sources that he will either pay the bill today or taken into custody. all of this he is ahead of a full revocation hearing. a proivation revocation hearing. remember, he is on five years probation for bank fraud and talked to by probation officers and clearly a feeling in the federal courts that he violated that probation order and now
pentagon officials who serve in the obama administration talked about the world of national security in the presidential election. this is an hour. >> we're going to go ahead and get started. people will be straggling in. you are encouraged to help yourself to food or whenever you need. in the co-founder and senior vice president of a third way. on behalf of my colleagues, somewhere, national security program, welcome. before i handed over to bill, i had just a couple of things i wanted to talk about relating to our work on national security. as mitt romney discovered on september 11 of this year, nothing has the power to shake up a presidential race like a change in a national security. that can be an external event as we had in libya or is to be a political mistake. i learned that the hard way when i was a junior campaign staffer working for mike dukakis. i was there at the moment when he was climbing into that tank. i am here to tell you that you can shake up the race all kinds of ways off when it comes to national security. if he back then, in 1988, democrats are in the middle of
allow. this all coming as pentagon officials and many are discussing still talking about investigating that attack on the consulate in benghazi, libya, that killed ama basder chris stevens and three others. >>> a dramatic warning from israel's prime minister, prime minister benjamin netanyahu, but would the red line he's calling for really a stop iran's efforts toevelop a nuclear weapon? stand by. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. d everdae, 've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars h to a businesses w were fected, and to cover cleanup costs. todaeaes and gulf are for everyone tonjoy - areas aortire rep their seasons rs.in yea we've shared what we've learned with governments and across the industry so we can all produce energy more safely. i want you to know, there's another commitment bp takes just as seriously: our commitment to america. bp supports nearly two-hundred-fifty thousand jobs in communities across the country. we hired three thousand people just last year. bp invests more in america than in any other country. in
in the pentagon when you wanted to get a lot of people that meetings ten years ago you use the word transformation command five years ago you use the word cyber and now you use the word supply chain. it's amazing how many people are interested in it these days, but there's a whole group of individuals at the dod and within the services looking specifically at that question. i tend to look at it. my portfolio is from the industrial base how we arrive and interact with the industrial base but it's a very serious challenge and i can tell you the supply chain folks under the osd with each of the services are looking at it to try to come up with these not one-size-fits-all solutions that try to come up with something that is not just appropriate for today but scalable and flexible enough will be appropriate in five to ten years and i would be happy to put people in touch if you are interested in knowing about them but there's a lot of aggressive work going on right now. >> so, we talked about authorities and some of the things that the various levers that we might have out there. we talked about the ma
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)